Riverpark Dental

What is it

Following a root canal treatment, the tooth that has been treated can heal improperly or become infected again and need to have an Endodontic Retreatment.

When is it needed/Risks of not getting it done

A tooth with a root canal can have its healing disrupted by:

  • Narrow or curved canals that were left untreated during the first root canal treatment.
  • Complex canals that were unnoticed during the first root canal treatment.
  • The restorative filling or crown was not inserted into the tooth quickly enough during the first root canal treatment.
  • The restorative filling or crown was unable to prevent saliva from entering and infecting the inside of the initially treated tooth.

Cases occur where a successful root canal is performed but new problems still arise. For example:

  1. If the tooth starts to decay again, the filling material that was inserted in the initial treatment can become exposed and be at risk for contamination.
  2. A tooth can have complex canals that can go undetected during the initial treatment.
  3. If the filling becomes cracked or the crown exposes the filling then the tooth can be at risk of contamination.

How is it done

  1. If the Dentist recommends an Endodontic Retreatment, they will need access to the root canal filling and will reopen the tooth.
  2. Next, the Dentist will remove the filling material so they can treat the root canal(s).
  3. Third, the Dentist will examine and clean the inside of the troublesome tooth.
  4. Lastly, the Dentist will fill and seal the tooth's canal(s) carefully with the restorative material and a crown to restore full functionality and structure to the tooth.
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