Riverpark Dental

What is a Root Canal?

A root canal treatment involves removing disease nerve tissue from inside the tooth. Root canals are a common alternative to dental extractions.

When is it needed / Risks of not getting it done

Most likely a severe cavity has caused the tooth’s internal tissue to become infected. Cavities start off slow, but once they reach the inner tissues they begin to spread faster. The tooth can become abscessed (pus formation) and cause swelling in the face and neck. If no action is taken at this stage in a tooth’s infection, the tooth will eventually be lost in addition to bone loss and tissue infection in the adjacent regions.

Teeth that have been cracked or shattered may also need the root canal treatment. You can learn more about cracked teeth and root canal treatments here.

The Treatment

  1. We first need to create a small access hole in the tooth’s occlusal surface so that we can physically remove the infected tissue.
  2. We then remove all the infected tissue: the pulp, nerve and other debris.
  3. Next, a disinfecting solution is washed through the tooth’s canals to ensure no debris is left behind and the infection is dead.
  4. The canals are then slightly expanded to make room for the filling.
  5. At last, the canals, pulp chamber, and access hole are filled with a composite material and sealed.

Other Types of Root Canal Treatment

We’ve gone over the root canal treatment, but other variations of the treatment are available and may be more suitable depending on the situation. Learn more about them below.

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